• Kinhin (walking meditation)

    Grass, soil, wood, velvet. 9" x 3.5" x 4"; 22.5 cm x 9 cm x 10 cm

    This is an object that grows. A pair of Geta sandals is covered with soil. With daily watering seeds begin to germinate and after seven days each sandal is covered in green grass. The grass will continue to grow as long as it is watered.

    This piece was born from the question: what does it mean to be in the present moment and how does a journey made mindfully look like? It answers with an image that references the Buddhist idea that to really experience the world as it is, one’s mind needs to be grounded in the present moment. The grass is not greener somewhere else or at some other time, but right under my feet; right here, right now. Instead of breaking seven iron sandals as the hero of my childhood fairytales, these sandals are the image of my commitment to be present; walking with me, growing with me, having me grow with them.

  • Wisdom of the Earth

    Bee hive [Apis melifera], plant [Dracaena marginata], hydroponic system, mini video camera, TV set, polyurethane, wood, acrylic tubing. Dimensions vary.

    Wisdom of the Earth is a process-based installation dependent upon two living systems: a beehive and a plant. For the duration of the show the bee colony lives in the gallery and collected pollen from the surrounding area. As the beehive grows, it builds a honeycomb inside the clear [human] brain shaped form provided. A television set projects close-up views from the interior of the brain.

    On a different scale and schedule, we can observe the growth of a plant in a hydroponic system, developing its roots inside a second clear [human] brain shaped form. Growing at an invisible rate to the naked eye, the plant develops a hybrid root system based on its genetic blueprint and the environment provided.

    We are observing two complex adaptive systems guided by a kind of “virtual brain”.

  • Philosopher’s Stone

    Two beehives [Apis Melifera], two mini video cameras, two TV sets, polyurethane, wood, acrylic tubing. Dimensions vary.

    Philosopher’s Stone is a process-based installation dependent upon two communities of bees. For a period of one month the bee colonies live in the gallery and collect pollen from the surrounding area. As the beehives grow, each begins to build a honeycomb inside the clear human brain shaped forms provided. Two television sets project close-up views from the interior of each brain. The visitors are invited to observe how two beehives develop “honeycomb brains” throughout the five weeks of the exhibition.

    The main goal of this project was to observe how the genetic programming of the bees, as it relates to the building of the comb, interacts with a predetermined shape - in this case the human brain.